Local purple, seafoam, green, blue, cobalt and white sea glass photographed by Mornington Sea Glass at rock pools on the Mornington  Peninsula, Victoria, Australia.

SEA GLASS COLOURS

Whilst sea glass can be found along the shores of the Mornington Peninsula, the increased popularity of looking for sea glass, the end of coastal dumping by our seaside towns in the past and the introduction of plastics has made these little marine gems a lot more difficult to find in the present day.
Our collection is based on 20 plus years of beach combing and the jewellery we make today still draws on these finds from many years ago when it was easier to hunt for sea glass.
Our information about sea glass we have found on the Mornington Peninsula is based on experiences over a couple of decades, bearing in mind the current landscape has now changed significantly due to larger numbers of people looking for it.

SEA GLASS

FROM THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

We have identified a colour range below to give you an idea of our likelihood of finding certain colours based on our local beachcombing experience.  Please note the harder to find and very rare to find are often found as extremely small shards so it can be difficult for us to offer jewellery with locally found glass in these rarer colour ranges. Aside from a collector point of view, this is the main reason we source these rarer colours from overseas so we can offer a broader range of colours in our jewellery design.

While colour is a useful guide, level of frosting, thickness, shape and level of markings are also important characteristics in assessing the quality of genuine sea glass. However, whilst a colour may or may not be considered rare in the sea glass collecting world, if it connects with you then it is perfect!

Local seafoam, green, blue and white sea glass photographed by Mornington Sea Glass at rock pools on the Mornington  Peninsula, Victoria, Australia.

Easier to find and less common to find sea glass colours

Easier to find- green, brown & white.
Easier to find glass sources: alcohol, bitters, medicine, milk, soft drink, food jars, windows, windshields, tableware, vases
Less common to find- honey amber, seafoam, pale green, soft blue, pale aqua, green shades.
Less Common to find glass sources: alcohol, mineral water, soft drink, fruit jars, medicine, baking powder
Local turquoise sea glass photographed by Mornington Sea Glass at beach on the Mornington  Peninsula, Victoria, Australia.

Hard to find and rare sea glass colours

Hard to find- black, purple, grey, cobalt blue, cornflower blue, ice blue, aquamarine, citron, lime green, teal, grey, milk glass
Hard to find glass sources: tableware, vases, alcohol, medicine, poison, insulators, depression era glassware, food containers, cosmetic jars, ink
Rare to find- red, orange, yellow, pink turquoise
Rare to find glass sources: depression era glassware, art glass, stained glass, warning lights, vases, perfume, decorative bottles

Rare English multi colour sea glass photographed by Mornington Sea Glass at beach on the Mornington  Peninsula, Victoria, Australia.

English multi colour sea glass

Our collection of genuine multi colour sea glass is sourced from a friend in England. The multi coloured sea glass, in particular, has an interesting story. During the Victorian Era, dating from the mid 1800’s, the North East of England became famed for its glass making history. Excess glass during the glass making process was cut off and collected near the kiln during the course of the day.
Colours would become mixed and layered and then at the end of the day would get tossed out into the Northern Sea. For many years these beautiful multi coloured gems have been washing up along local shores.
Multi coloured sea glass is considered extremely rare in the sea glass-collecting world!
Japanese ocean teal and green sea glass photographed by Mornington Sea Glass at the beach on the Mornington  Peninsula, Victoria, Australia.

Japanese Sea Glass

An absolute favourite of ours is sea glass from a friend in Japan. Why? Because they have so many shades of aqua, turquoise and teals!
These stunning shades of ocean hues predominately come from glass bottles that held sake (the alcohol), shoyu (soya sauce), soda drinks like ramune and glass fishing floats.

REACH OUT ON SOCIALS

@mornington_sea_glass

Looking for inspiration or have a quick question - please direct message us on socials and we will come back to you within 2 business days.